What is Counselling?





Short 2-minute video explaining about Counselling and how it works

"I began sessions with Alaric earlier this year due to a couple of events which left me feeling a bit rudderless and devoid of a strategy to work through associated emotions. I admit to being a bit sceptical when beginning the process but I have to say that I am an unreserved convert.

The therapy sessions not only helped me work through the things that I was struggling to deal with, but have actually readjusted my outlook on life. I will have no hesitation returning and would highly recommend the process. From my perspective it was 5 [out of 5] - I got way more from it than I expected."

- J.B. -

Talking therapy is about acknowledging, articulating, describing and giving voice to experience. This helps connect us to who we are and bring into the foreground aspects of ourselves that we view as taboo or unacceptable and with that a greater sense of aliveness and wholeness. The basic premise of this type of therapy is that a lot of the difficulties that we have are rooted in certain aspects of our experience not being fully acknowledged or allowed, and without experience being acknowledged and allowed it cannot change. Therapy involves describing what is happening, expressing oneself and opening up more fully to direct experience. This can involve looking at any aspect of an individual's life, from dreams and bodily sensations to concrete interactions in the world or phobias and deeply held views.

The therapy I offer is informed by the understanding that to accurately describe and express what is being experienced is to change it. A common concern is that having talked about an issue nothing will have changed – life and its frustrations will be the same. However I suggest that talking in a real and emotionally connected way can be transformative and actually change one's experience of oneself, others and life. Hitherto locked up resources and energy can be freed and there can be a palpable sense of lightness and relief. We all know that feeling of rightness when we put our finger on what exactly it is that is bothering us about another's behaviour or our place in a particular situation: 'No it's not just that I don't like them or that I feel uncomfortable when they talk to me. It's like I feel small, no not exactly small; more hidden, sort of crouching – ah yes I feel like someone under siege who might get attacked at any moment!' In a way therapy is like that – a space where what is already half known can come into the light and the energy that has been wasted in resisting and defending against what seems unacceptable, childish or hateful is naturally re-directed towards contentment and well-being.

Below is a fuller, though not exclusive, list of some of the issues which counselling can help with:

  • Work-related issues
  • Stress
  • Depression
  • Anxiety & panic
  • Bereavement
  • Traumatic events
  • Identity issues
  • Anger
  • Grief
  • Loss
  • Low self-esteem
  • Body Issues
  • Somatic problems
  • Insomnia
  • Relationship issues
  • Sexual difficulties
  • Sexuality
  • Harassment & bullying
  • Existential crisis
  • Spiritual concerns
  • Hopelessness & meaninglessness
  • Suicidal feelings
  • Shyness
  • Over- & under-eating
  • Sexual abuse
  • Lack of confidence
  • Vague unease
  • Addictions & compulsive behaviour
  • Phobias
  • Loneliness
  • Drug mis-use
  • Cultural issues
  • Endings: relationships, projects, a life stage



 

What is Counselling?





Short 2-minute video explaining about Counselling and how it works

"I began sessions with Alaric earlier this year due to a couple of events which left me feeling a bit rudderless and devoid of a strategy to work through associated emotions. I admit to being a bit sceptical when beginning the process but I have to say that I am an unreserved convert.

The therapy sessions not only helped me work through the things that I was struggling to deal with, but have actually readjusted my outlook on life. I will have no hesitation returning and would highly recommend the process. From my perspective it was 5 [out of 5] - I got way more from it than I expected."

- J.B. -

Talking therapy is about acknowledging, articulating, describing and giving voice to experience. This helps connect us to who we are and bring into the foreground aspects of ourselves that we view as taboo or unacceptable and with that a greater sense of aliveness and wholeness. The basic premise of this type of therapy is that a lot of the difficulties that we have are rooted in certain aspects of our experience not being fully acknowledged or allowed, and without experience being acknowledged and allowed it cannot change. Therapy involves describing what is happening, expressing oneself and opening up more fully to direct experience. This can involve looking at any aspect of an individual's life, from dreams and bodily sensations to concrete interactions in the world or phobias and deeply held views.

The therapy I offer is informed by the understanding that to accurately describe and express what is being experienced is to change it. A common concern is that having talked about an issue nothing will have changed – life and its frustrations will be the same. However I suggest that talking in a real and emotionally connected way can be transformative and actually change one's experience of oneself, others and life. Hitherto locked up resources and energy can be freed and there can be a palpable sense of lightness and relief. We all know that feeling of rightness when we put our finger on what exactly it is that is bothering us about another's behaviour or our place in a particular situation: 'No it's not just that I don't like them or that I feel uncomfortable when they talk to me. It's like I feel small, no not exactly small; more hidden, sort of crouching – ah yes I feel like someone under siege who might get attacked at any moment!' In a way therapy is like that – a space where what is already half known can come into the light and the energy that has been wasted in resisting and defending against what seems unacceptable, childish or hateful is naturally re-directed towards contentment and well-being.

Below is a fuller, though not exclusive, list of some of the issues which counselling can help with:

  • Work-related issues
  • Stress
  • Depression
  • Anxiety & panic
  • Bereavement
  • Traumatic events
  • Identity issues
  • Anger
  • Grief
  • Loss
  • Low self-esteem
  • Body Issues
  • Somatic problems
  • Insomnia
  • Relationship issues
  • Sexual difficulties
  • Sexuality
  • Harassment & bullying
  • Existential crisis
  • Spiritual concerns
  • Hopelessness & meaninglessness
  • Suicidal feelings
  • Shyness
  • Over- & under-eating
  • Sexual abuse
  • Lack of confidence
  • Vague unease
  • Addictions & compulsive behaviour
  • Phobias
  • Loneliness
  • Drug mis-use
  • Cultural issues
  • Endings: relationships, projects, a life stage


Alaric Everett - Open-Therapy

Black Prince Road, London, SE1 7SJ